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Visit any farmer's market in the Twin Cities and you're likely to see Hmong vendors selling rasberries, sweet onions, and a host of other produce they've grown. Farming runs deep in the Hmong culture. However, many Hmong farmers are isolated both by culture and language from the rest of U.S. agriculture. They often have difficulty getting resources and finding information. One local grower says until that changes, Hmong farmers will always be at risk. Minnesota Public Radio's Roseanne Pereira {Puh-RAR-uh} reports. {

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Digitization made possible by the State of Minnesota Legacy Amendment’s Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund, approved by voters in 2008.

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